Romelu Lukaku finally put an end to his nightmare stint at Old Trafford, flourishing once again as the prolific striker he once was at Everton and the Belgian national team.

However, he’s still a matter of controversies amid Manchester United supporters, including former Red Devil Paul Parker, who had a lot to say about him and Alexis Sanchez.

Parker claimed the team’s management didn’t allow Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to sign a quality replacement for Lukaku, hence the team ended up struggling to score goals to start the season:

“The problem is when you have a long term plan, you can only go as far as the people above will allow, so you have to also work with the short term in mind. He (Solskjaer) wanted Lukaku to go, and he would have liked a replacement, but as we know he wasn’t allowed to,” Parker told the WeAreTheBusbyBoys podcast.

Moreover, the former defender went on to explain why the team was right about sending away Alexis Sanchez, even if it meant losing a bit of the money they had originally invested in him.

“As far as Sanchez goes, if he’d kept him and not used him, or he’d have got injured, or if he’d kept him and used him and his performances continued to dip, he would have been slaughtered for not getting him out. I think in the long term it’s still absolutely right,” he added.

But as for Lukaku, Parker went on to bash him because of his so-called attitude problem during his last season with the Red Devils, claiming he disrespected the team’s badge and being grateful for his departure:

“With Sanchez they’ve been able to get rid of a portion of the money and there was obviously an issue with Lukaku, an attitude problem and the way he conducted himself didn’t help, he disrespected the badge on the shirt. It’s the long game he looked at and in my opinion, it’s to the benefit of the dressing room,” he concluded.

Lukaku made 66 appearances for Machester United from 2017-19, scoring just 28 goals after the team invested £75 million in his services, and he’ll go down as one of the biggest busts in modern United history.