Skip to main content

Report: Magic Johnson Put Major Pressure On Luke Walton In Recent Meeting

ea5fe9bd31433ec20f3b789e2e9df948

We all knew going into this season that it would take some major adjustments for the Lakers to get where they want to be.

Yet, sitting at a 3-5 record eight games into the season, something just seems off about the team.

It could be LeBron, who's older age and exhausted body could finally be starting to show. It could be Brandon Ingram, who hasn't quite stepped up in the way most thought he would. It could be Rajon Rondo, who's role and place on the team seems a bit murky at the moment.

Whatever the case, it seems the first person the team has decided to blame is not LeBron or Ingram or Rondo, but head coach Luke Walton.

According to Adrian Wojnarowski and Dave McMenamin, Lakers President Magic Johnson "admonished" Luke for the team's slow start in a recent meeting between the two.

In a meeting on Tuesday, following a winless two-game trip, Los Angeles Lakers president Magic Johnson admonished coach Luke Walton for the team's sluggish start to the season.

Johnson's cutting appraisal elevated an already acute awareness within the Lakers coaching staff that there are intense and immediate pressures on Walton to deliver the franchise a winner in short order.

Despite Johnson's prior proclamations of needing to allow time for Walton to develop a young roster surrounding four-time MVP LeBron James, evidence is mounting that Walton's job security ultimately depends upon his ability to significantly improve upon a 3-5 record to start the season.

If we are to believe the report, Walton is very much fighting for his job and could lose it if the team doesn't "significantly" improve.

For a guy that has seen the Lakers through very tough times, it may seem harsh to threaten his job just a few weeks into a lengthy season.

Nonetheless, that is just the way things go when a market such as Los Angeles finds itself with the greatest player of the generation. Pressure lifts, expectation mounts, and margin for error is thin.