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Shaquille O'Neal And Charles Barkley Tried To Play Defense Against Inside The MLB On TBS Crew, But Their Defense Was Terrible: "What Are You Doing?"

Shaquille O'Neal And Charles Barkley Tried To Play Defense Against Inside The NBA Crew, But Their Defense Was Terrible: "What Are You Doing?"

Shaquille O'Neal and Charles Barkley are two of the best players ever in their respective positions, making history and creating huge legacies during their careers. Now that they are analysts, things haven't changed as Shaq and Chuck are considered two of the most entertaining out there. 

As great as they were on the court, it seems like retirement has really affected them. They couldn't complete a simple drill during a recent edition of TNT's Inside the NBA. Kenny Smith tried to explain how the Golden State Warriors' offense works and what makes them dangerous against any defense, using O'Neal and Barkley as defensive players. 

The former Houston Rockets player used the dynamic duo and invite MLB legends Pedro Martinez, Jimmy Rollins, and Curtis Granderson (part of the MLB on TBS crew) to the court to explain how easily the Dubs disrupt through defenses and make baskets. 

He explained the play, with Martinez as the point guard. Chuck guarded Granderson and Shaq took on Rollins. The former Detroit Tigers and New York Yankees player left Chuck to set the pick with Shaq, Rolling drew the attention of Barkley and Curtis easily scored on the Big Diesel. 

The play went perfectly for the offense and explained how easy it is for defenders to lose reference and let opponents score on them. They didn't communicate and the rivals took advantage of that. Yes, Granderson and Rollins are in better shape than Barkley and O'Neal, but they were baseball players. Yet, after not talking, it was easy to score for the other duo. 

Chuck didn't believe what Shaq did and asked him what was he doing, while Kenny celebrated with the rest of the crew. 

Basketball is a science and these men are well aware of that. it's great to see how something so simple can be studied before every game, yet it's very hard to carry out during matches.