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Spike Lee Shared The Inscription On The Stat Sheet From Kobe Bryant's 61-Point Madison Square Garden Show: "P.S Spike This Sh*t Was Your Fault."

Spike Lee Shared The Inscription On The Stat Sheet From Kobe Bryant's 61-Point Madison Square Garden Show: "P.S Spike This Sh*t Was Your Fault."

Kobe Bryant was one of the most lethal scorers in the history of the NBA. At any point in his career, Kobe could walk into the game, and go off for a ridiculous number of points against the opposition. And one night at Madison Square Garden, the Knicks suffered the wrath of Kobe Bryant's explosive scoring.

One person who was in attendance was legendary director Spike Lee. Lee, one of the most famous NBA fans, and a die-hard Knicks fan was there to watch Kobe score an incredible 61-points against the Knicks at MSG, his career-high in the legendary arena. 

Kobe had famously told Spike Lee after the game, that his performance against the Knicks, and Michael Jordan's 55 points against them, were his fault. And he doubled down on that when he signed the stat-sheet from the game for Spike Lee. In that, he wrote a kind message for Spike but also reiterated that his performance was Lee's fault.

"To Spike, you are the best. P.S. Spike this sh*t was your fault."

Bryant is famous for finding any reason to motivate himself to perform at the highest level. Much like Michael Jordan, Kobe could use the slightest sign of disrespect in order to motivate themselves and destroy their opposition. Bryant was a natural scorer. But a motivated Kobe was a terrifyingly dominant scorer.

Bryant's scoring exploits have been chronicled in history. In fact, Bryant along with Michael Jordan and LeBron James, are the only players to average 20/5/5 for a period of a time in a season while being above the age of 36. And Kobe showed that his ability to score was ageless.

Bryant ended his career in the aptest way possible; scoring 60 points in his final game against the Utah Jazz surrounded by a packed Staples Center. He showed that even on his last day, he could score at will.