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JJ Redick Supports Shortening The NBA Season: "The Reality Is That The Wear And Tear On Our Bodies Is Very Different Than It Was 20-30 Years Ago."

JJ Redick Supports Shortening The NBA Season: "The Reality Is That The Wear And Tear On Our Bodies Is Very Different Than It Was 20-30 Years Ago."

Injuries are one of the worst aspects of any professional sport, and the NBA is no exception. Over the course of a long, 82-game season, the body suffers a lot of wear and tear, and it often leads to injuries that can sideline a player for months.

Recently, the influx of injuries has some suggesting shortening the length of the regular season from 82 games to 72 or even less.

On First Take Tuesday morning, JJ Redick revisited the subject and explained why he believes the move could be beneficial for the NBA and everyone involved:

"I have always said that every era of basketball should be celebrated, every era of basketball should be acknowledged. We pay homage to the greats and the old heads all the time, and we wouldn't have our league if it wasn't for people like Bob Cousy, Wilt Chamberlain, and Magic Johnson, and Dr. J. I wish all those guys would have been able to sign the contracts that we are able to sign."

"The only other point I wanted to make, real quick, is that the type of basketball that is played in the modern NBA and the amount of possession there are if you look back at the 90s. The Cleveland Cavaliers, back in 1986, averaged 84 possessions per game. The lowest in the game this year was, I believe, the Dallas Mavericks and that was around 93 possessions. For the vast majority of teams, you're playing 100, 105 possessions a game, you're running all over the court. It's the spacing, too. The amount of action and load you're putting on your body. The reality is the wear and tear on our bodies is very different than it was 20-30 years ago and that's a fact."

JJ makes a fair point. While the game may not be as physical as it once was, it's much faster, and players are being asked to run around at a frequency that takes a real toll on their bodies.

As controversial as it is, shortening the season may be the best thing to do if the NBA wants to increase the performance and health of its stars through the regular season and beyond.