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Stephen Curry Would Need To Miss 500 Consecutive 3-Pointers To Fall Below Ray Allen's Career 3-PT%

Stephen Curry Would Need To Miss 500 Consecutive 3-Pointers To Fall Below Ray Allen's Career 3-PT%

Stephen Curry set the mark as the most proficient 3-point shooter of all time during the 2021-22 season, surpassing Ray Allen to become the all-time leader in shooting. It was only natural that Curry gets that spot after unofficially being called the greatest shooter ever for a long time. 

Steph is also one of the most efficient 3-point shooters in the history of the game. While he isn't as efficient as his younger brother, Steph has shot threes at a 42.8% clip over his career. This is extremely impressive considering the volume at which Curry has been attempting 3-point shots.

Curry's efficiency seems crazier when you think about Ray Allen's position as the former leader of the all-time threes list. Allen shot exactly 40% on threes in his career. For Steph's efficiency to fall to 40%, the Warriors guard will need to miss 500 consecutive three-pointers.

Stephen Curry has made 3117 3-pointers over the course of his career. Despite having early injury struggles in his career and missing a year in 2019-20 for the same reason, Curry has decimated every single major 3-point record. Not only has he made more 3s than Ray Allen, but he also did it with better efficiency while attempting about 3 shots from beyond the arc more than Allen through his career.

Allen was phenomenal for his time, but his shooting was never highlighted as the centerpiece on a championship team. He was extremely valuable to the Miami Heat and Boston Celtics titles, but not as the primary option on either team.

Curry has become a one-man offensive system with his ability to shoot. After winning their 4th championship this season, the Warriors did so by highlighting Curry as the face of the franchise and letting him run the show for the Bay Area team for years. Steph won't miss 500 shots in a row, so it doesn't look like Curry and Allen will ever be on level terms from an efficiency perspective.