(via Fadeaway World)

As John Wall sits on the cusp of a return to the NBA, many are wondering just what kind of player we’ll see.

Will Wall be the quick, high-flying guard we’re used to seeing, or will the Achilles injury severely limit what he can do on the basketball court next season?

The fact is, we don’t know what kind of player Wall will be once he’s back and it’s the cause of much concern around the association. For the Wizards especially, they’re paying the guy upwards of $140+ million over the next three years.

Meanwhile, in Philadelphia, the Sixers are paying Al Horford max money despite a lack of significant production. Just a few months removed from a near All-Star performance in Boston, he has struggled to find his footing with his new team.

Bearing in mind the current situation in Philly and Washington, consider this: a trade involving John Wall to the Sixers for AL Horford.

(via CBS Sports)

“The 76ers would essentially take on that extra money to get two cost-controlled seasons of Wagner, who, before his mid-season ankle injury, was shooting nearly 40 percent from behind the arc and was averaging 18.8 points and 10.1 rebounds per 36 minutes. His numbers have since regressed, though whether that was due to injury or skill cannot be said. Anything Wall would provide in this scenario is likely a bonus, though for what it’s worth, at his peak he was arguably the best generator of 3-point attempts for teammates in the NBA. His own shooting leaves much to be desired, but in the right setting, Wall is a spacing booster.”

Horford is averaging just 11 points per game on 43% shooting this season. As a team, the 76ers have struggled to gain any real momentum in the East, and are entering the postseason with a whole lot more questions than answers. If the Sixers can move him for a guy in John Wall, who could handle the ball, score in the paint, and drive the fastbreak, one has to think it’s an opportunity they would jump at.

For the Wizards, they get a solid big in Horford while (more importantly) getting Wall’s high-priced contract off the books. While Horford is making a similarly pricey deal, paying him is much less of a risk than paying Wall, who hasn’t played in almost two seasons now.

It’ll be interesting to see what kinds of scenarios play out in the 2020 offseason and which teams will be ready for a breakout season after re-tolling in the summer.

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