Overpaying for NBA players is one of the decisions that managers regret in no time, as players age, new talents surge, they suffer injuries or they’re just unable to live up to the expectations that surround them.

Players tend to get overhyped and overpaid when they come off solid contract years and then their motivation to prove their worth really takes a toll, and they’re unable to sustain their great performances.

Other players look as if they offer a lot of upsides but peak early or never fulfill their potential, becoming more liabilities than actual contributors. Today, we’re going to let you know about 10 players their teams want to trade but find it really difficult due to their contract, injuries or because of their status right now.

 

10. Dion Waiters – $11,5 million

Dion Waiters have always been so full of himself but he’s not once proven that he’s got what it takes to be a consistent elite scorer in this league, not to mention his lack of defensive commitment.

Waiters could still be a very solid pickup if he could embrace a lesser role and deal with the fact that he’s nowhere near half as good as he thinks he is, but coming off a season-ending injury, he’s not going to have many takers.

 

9. Tyler Johnson – $19,2 million 2018/19

Credit: USA Today

Tyler Johnson is a very solid young baller, but he’s nothing more than a role player. That being said, he’s hardworking and can do a little bit of everything and rarely makes any careless mistakes.

Even so, he’s one of the most overpaid players in the league and is not even close, and he’s just chugging a lot of the cap space that could be used in an actual star or at least more role players.

 

8. Hassan Whiteside – $25,4 million per year

Hassan Whiteside does a lot of talking but is unable to back up the talk with his performances, and he’s even lost Erik Spoelstra’s confidence during crunch time despite being a so-called elite rim protector.

He could still be really useful for a team desperate for a presence down low but considering his high paying contract and his self-centered personality, and the fact that everybody knows he wants out, he’s not going to draw many good offers.

 

7. JR Smith – $14,7 million per year

JR Smith is coming off a terrible season, and he’s not getting any younger. He’s never been a smart guy, and if he starts losing his physical gifts and shooting stroke, there’s absolutely no reason why any team would want him.

Following his antics in the Finals, Smith is set to be a major liability in both ends of the hardwood for the post LeBron Cleveland Cavaliers, as they’re likely to have to part ways with picks to get rid of him.

 

6. Tristan Thompson – $17,4 million per year

Tristan Thompson got paid big time for rebounding LeBron’s bricks and being nice to him, let’s not kid ourselves. The Canadian big man is not a good defender and is a terrible offensive player as well.

Other than offensive rebounds, he doesn’t bring anything to the table and with that kind of contract, nobody’s going to be even slightly interested in trading for him, unless the Cavs pair prospects or picks with them.

 

5. Luol Deng – $18,0 million per year

Is Luol Deng still in the league? Yes, we know that’s exactly what you thought when you read his name on this list. Spoiler alert: Yes, he still is, and he’s set to share his locker room with LeBron James this season.

Deng hasn’t retired merely because of the fact that the Los Angeles Lakers were dumb enough to hand him a huge offer sheet despite his age and their desire to rebuild via NBA Draft. So, they’re pretty much stuck with him.

 

4. Joakim Noah – $18,5 million per year

Joakim Noah was hurt or suspended for most of the prior campaign and the fact that he got into Hornacek’s face may not do much to help his case of ever playing again for the sluggish New York Knicks.

Noah is no longer the defensive stud he used to be and even though he could still bring a lot of hustle off the bench for a contending team, he’s nowhere worthy of the huge amount of money he’s still owed.

 

3. Chandler Parsons – $24,1 million per year

Chandler Parsons was coming together as a very solid small forward when he joined the Memphis Grizzlies, but ever since; his career has taken a major downfall up to the point where he’s never been able to be truly healthy again.

When able to play, Parsons looked slow, unconfident and without any kind of feel for the game on either side of the hardwood, and even though he’s still young, he’s not worthy of the risk anymore.

 

2. Ryan Anderson – $20,4 million per year

Ryan Anderson, the poor man’s Kevin Love. He’s a great sharpshooter and can really space the floor, something any team trying to embrace the run and gun offense would really love to have on board.

Still, he doesn’t offer anything at all other than his sweet stroke from beyond the arc, as he’s not even a good rebounder and lacks any kind of defensive awareness. The Rockets don’t need him anymore, but nobody will try to get him away from them.

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1. Nicolas Batum – $24,0 million per year

Not so long ago, Nicolas Batum was one of the most underrated players in the league. He could fill the stat sheet on a nightly basis, thrived of his great basketball IQ and versatility, but those days are far behind him.

Batum is aging and playing for a really bad team and doesn’t bring much upside for any contending side either. The Hornets have no incentive to play him, but with the kind of money they’re paying him, they don’t have many choices.

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