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Michael Jordan Has Studied LeBron James And Explains How He Would Stop Him: "If I Have To Guard Him, I’m Gonna Push Him Left 9 Out 10 Times. If He goes Right He’s Going To The Hole And I Can’t Stop Him. So, I Ain’t Letting Him Go Right.”

Michael Jordan Has Studied LeBron James And Explains How He Would Stop Him: "If I Have To Guard Him, I’m Gonna Push Him Left 9 Out 10 Times. If He goes Right He’s Going To The Hole And I Can’t Stop Him. So, I Ain’t Letting Him Go Right.”

When talking about the best players of all-time, most fans consider Michael Jordan and LeBron James to hold the top two spots. Both played in a different era, with different rules, and different playing styles as well.

Regardless of that, fans still wonder about what if the two players ever faced off against each other? Who will win? Will MJ be able to lock down James or will James get past the Chicago Bulls legend?

Well, back in 2013 Jordan was asked a question along similar lines. He was asked how would he stop the 2013 LeBron in a 1 vs. 1 battle. Knowing Mike and his love for being the best player ever, he gave a very smart and calculated answer.

"I study him [LeBron James]. When LeBron goes right, he usually drives; when he goes left, he usually shoots a jumper. It has to do with his mechanics and how he loads the ball for release. So, if I have to guard him, I’m gonna push him left 9 out 10 times. If he goes right he’s going to the hole and I can’t stop him. So, I ain’t letting him go right.”

As per MJ's answer, even he is aware of the fact that once LeBron puts his head down and decides to use his body advantage, it is nearly impossible to stop him. Moreover, here we are talking about the 2013 LeBron James, who was a different beast physically.

At the end of the day, Mike's answer suggests that he will like to take his chances if LeBron is shooting a jumper. In case he drives, it's pretty hard to stop him.

But it is easier said than done. Additionally, the current version of James is a better shooter as well. We have seen him drain the difficult mid-range fadeaway jumper numerous times. Maybe if Jordan was asked this question today, he will have a different answer.