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Chris Broussard Criticizes LeBron James For Insisting To Play With Son Bronny: “This Is Putting A Ton Of Pressure On Bronny To Get To The League In Two Years."

Chris Broussard Criticizes LeBron James For Insisting To Play With Son Bronny: “This Is Putting A Ton Of Pressure On Bronny To Get To The League In Two Years."

It has been 19 years since we first saw LeBron James play in the NBA. 4 championships and countless other accolades later, It seems like there is no stopping the 37-year-old from absolutely dominating the league.

Still one of the top players in the league, James just averaged a mind-boggling 30 points per game last season, showing no signs of slowing down. Given how he has sustained so far in his career, many expect the 4-time MVP to stick around in the league at least for three to four seasons more.

Recently, LeBron James has been very vocal about playing with his sons in the NBA. So far as to say that he might end up joining the team, Bronny is eventually drafted in, to play with his son.

But NBA analyst Chris Broussard thinks that LeBron James is undoubtedly putting some unnecessary pressure on Bronny to make it to the league. In an episode of his 'Odd Couple podcast, Broussard claims that Bronny James might feel intimidated by LBJ's comments.

“He shouldn’t be thinking about what’s in it for me. He got everything. It should be what’s best for Bronny, not what’s best for me. Jordan never did that, ‘Man, forget that!’ The best play is to let him develop and be ready. And maybe he will be, I’m not saying he won’t.”

“This is putting a ton of pressure on Bronny to get to the league in two years. Right now, he is not on a one-and-done trajectory … I would not want LeBron to pressure a team to draft Bronny before he’s ready. Because I don’t think that’s gonna help him. I think it has to be natural.”

“If he has to play three years of college then that means you don’t play with LeBron. Then so be it. The owners have to be on Bronny’s timetable and making sure he really is ready for the NBA rather than [saying] 'let’s get him there as soon as possible so he can play with LeBron.'”

Broussard certainly raises an important question here. LeBron has always referred to Bronny as being drafted in the NBA, but till now the 17-year-old is still showing only flashes of being a player ready for the league.

Apart from that, given that he is the son of an all-time great like James, pressure will be sky high on him to show up in the games and be the best player on the court. Bronny is already facing an uphill task to stand out among his peers. This pressure is only going to increase massively once he is eligible for his college.